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20100101
20100131
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Book TV 102
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CSPAN2 102
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 7:00am EST
" opening my mail i came across a press release from the library announcing for $10 million it but america's birth certificate, the waldseemuller map, the map that gave america its name and the $10 million was the most elaborate spent on anything and $2 million more than was recently paid for the original copy of the declaration of independence and that kind of got my attention and i never heard of or saw the map and the library thought it was worth it and the market thought it was worth more than the declaration of independence and i thought maybe i would do an article or short piece for the atlantic. so i did research and got the basics of the story, pretty quickly. early in the 1500, the eastern part of france, in the mountains, there was a small group of scholars, among them, the map maker, martin waldseemuller and that he came by letters, and an early sailor's chart showing the coastline of the new world and decided that what they were reading about and seeing on the charts of asia, as most people assumed it was but it was a new continent, people traditionally thought of the world as
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 7:00pm EST
for $10 million a but what it called americans for certification, the map the gave america its name. vechten million dollars was the most diverse finn on anything. it was almost $2 million more than had recently been paid for an original copy of the declaration of independence and that kind of got my attention. i had never heard of the map, had never seen a map but the library seemed to think it was the most valuable piece in the market seemed to think was more than the original copy of the declaration of independence, so i wanted to find out more and at this point i was thinking maybe i would do a short piece for the clint. so i did some research and got the basics of the story pretty quickly. early in the 1500's in the eastern part of france there was a small group of scholars. among them map maker martin waldseemuller and they came across-- y emir guo vespucci in the chart lines of the new world and they decided that what they were reading about in saying on these charts was not a part of asia as most people had assumed it was but in fact was a new continent. people traditionally
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2010 9:15pm EST
was was a revolution of principle rather than a claim of will which is a case for every other nation prior to america as often ruled by force. this is what is revolutionary about america. you see it very clearly between 1763 and 1766 between the french and indian war and colonies became generally independent in the british empire and 1776 when they declared independence. this punishment and a very unique situation separated by an ocean having come largely in search of their who religious freedom shipped by british constitutionalism, learning to govern themselves were forced to think through certain principles , certain ideas about the source of the legitimacy of government and the source of their rights. they are forced to think those things as never before. and so they thought about the principles. the book is built around ten core principles. the first and grand principle is that of liberty, the overarching theme of the nation's history. but here i deliberately choose the word liberty rather than the word freedom. anything can be free, not just people. animals can be freed, a ball rolling downhill
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 11:15pm EST
and showed a willingness to criticize america's actions and all too often in the united states it starts by dictating and we don't know all of the factors involved in he had knowledge to the depth of the strains in europe -- relations when there was no reason in america could not restore the same respect in partnership america had with the muslim world as recently as 20 or 30 years ago. in other words, we have to go back 20 or 30 years to find a moment when there was a good working partnership so obama's recognized the mistrust and how far back it dated. and in this lies the essential appeal of obama's words to his cairo audience and he recognized the historic roots of the 21st century and a place that america roll out-- and the role they played. bring in the discussion back i have spent the past 20 years of my life teaching the history of the region and i did write the book. like president obama i do believe the historic background is essential for addressing current affairs and the complex issues in the middle east others a to pay far more attention was what deals with the arabs today.
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 11:00am EST
that america's competitive advantage is in financial products and financial engineering. and that these banks do produce a lot of foreign armies for the u.s. and if we start really knocking down wall street, which is getting competitive advantage to the germans, british, japanese or whoever, i don't agree with that. but you know, i think it underlies a lot of the reluctance of the administration to really get to too tough with wall street that they say it's like yesterday was good for general motors is good for america. now it's what's good for goldman sachs is good for america. not necessary goal but because they are so unpopular. but what's good for jpmorgan chase is good for america. >> no line has been drawn. there's been no edition. basically mathematics. so therefore says that as it may be, deficit. since we are tiptoeing past the cemetery nobody wants to do the math. >> there are some people, the argument here is that banks haven't dealt with a bad debt problem. they're still sitting on their balance sheet so we will end up like japan presumably. i think there is very respected people,
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 8:00am EST
't for sea sickness, everyone should like to be a sailor. duty was to map the coastline of south america. and so we proceeded down the coast, and on the way, i dredged the sea with nets and i collected specimens along the shore, wore a hat like this one and every day, just after the sailors had finished swabbing the deck, i would load it up with hundreds of new specimens to be sorted and labeled. they soon became distinctly air aromatic in the equatorial sun. one sailor asked me, mr. darwin, would you mind getting that stinking pile of ripe refuse off my deck? stinking pile of refuse. but there are so many wonderful things here. ♪ some day people will pay just to see them on display, at the british museum ♪ ♪ i've dug in the ground and these rocks that i found have the features of creatures no longer around ♪ ♪ here are trilobyte beds by the ton ♪ ♪ what a glorious day, what a wonderful way to have fun ♪ ♪ i've searched by the shore and collected some more ♪ ♪ worms and star wish and gar fish and gobies galore ♪ i've got shark eggs and sea weed and slime ♪ ♪
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 1:00am EST
for $10 million ahead of what it called america's birth certificate. the math that gave america its name. that $10 million was the most the library had ever spent on anything. it was also almost $2 million more than had recently been paid for an original copy of the declaration of independence, and that kind of caught my attention. i never heard of the map or had seen the map but the library seemed to think it was the most valuable piece and the market even seemed to think it was more than an original copy of the declaration of independence. so, i wanted to find out more and at this point i was thinking maybe i would do an article, short piece for the alana tech. so i did some research and got the basics of the story pretty quickly. early in the 1500's in the eastern part of france in the mountains there was a small group of scholars among them the mapmaker martin and he had come across letters and at least one early sailors chart showing the coastlines of the new world and they decided that what they were reading about and see on the charts was not a part of asia as most people had assu
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 7:00pm EST
the seasickness, everyone should like to be a sailer. our duty was to map the coastline of south america. and so we proceeded down the coast, and on the way i dredged the sea with the nets, and i collected specimens along the shore. i wore a hat like this one. everyday just after the sailors had finished swabbing the deck i would loaded up with hundreds of of new specimens to be sorted and labeled. this they soon became distinctly aromatic in the ecuadorean sun. in fact i remember a sailor asked me, mr. darwin, would you mind getting that stinking pile of refuse of my deck? sticking pile of refuse? there are so many wonderful things here. someday people will pay just to see them on display at the british museum. ♪ i've dug in the ground, and these rocks that have found have the features of creatures no longer around. there are trilobites by the ton. what a glorious day. what a wonderful way to have fun. ♪ i've searched by the shore and collected some more worms and starfish and garfish and kolbe's galore. i have got shark heads and some seaweed and slime. i am having the loveliest this time.
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 10:00pm EST
. in some will show this has been like behind in america. strangely enough today i found it rasmussen poll through september show wayne favorability ratings for various professions. small-business owners those who start their own business are ring to #1 and number two. they are doing fine but the ceo is second to last. outside the entrepreneurial circle is not seen favorably as of -- at all in america. the good news the very last category is members of congress. [laughter] what i found to be the most finding it at all our people randomly selected from the phone book to do a better job than congress. but our guest today michael medved takes away the misconception of business head on in his book, it "the 5 big lies about american business." mr. medved is a premier political commentator hosting a daily talk show that has 5 million listeners each day. also a veteran film critic and an ex liberal at one time working for the left-of-center congressman from california and talk about your unpopular profession, he also came close to being a lawyer to the yale law school with bill clinton and hillar
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 5:15pm EST
that happened on the national level but fundamentally changed america and essentially the foundations for the kind of society that could elect somebody like barack obama, president in 2008 and those are the voting rights act of 65, the civil rights act of '64 and immigration act of 65 and most people don't know the legislation's and they all happened under lyndon johnson and fundamentally transform who is american, who can vote, who can participate in the american's creation of a society and political system and so when i decided to do is put together an alternate tie line of defense from 65 to the present that are important from an arab american perspective so of course these are important to all americans like 9/11 and other things since the american memory is much shorter than for example the air of memory. those defense the 73 energy crisis or the 91 gulf war passed from american memory as a significant moments and then other defense like what happens in california 1985 are completely unknown to anybody outside arab america or progress of circles and had quite an impact on the com
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 4:00pm EST
and in russia and england, but you can shoot them in america. you can't bring the carcass of the polar bear you shot them roust into the united states. i met someone in the united states was on this this very trip that i'm about to tell you about. we were on the ship in the background called cappy time and those of you who side with an russian icebreaker strand in the antarctic a couple of weeks ago was the sister ship of this one. and it looks very much like this. it looks like somebody said that a block of flats on a barge. and we the cabin upon the upper deck and had a huge bridge from which we could see everything. the point of this trip, was one of the leaders of the trip. we were going to the north pole. when you travel and as part of the world nbc bears off in the distance, as i said it's usually over there you see that white and moving. that's the bear. while this is somewhat closer. we had a bear that came this close to the ship and it was right alongside the ship. this will give you an idea, shooting rolls of film. remember what rolls of film or? wish i'd rolls of film of this bear th
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 2:15pm EST
, transformed latin america, eastern europe and asia, that created stable prosperous democracies was the middle-class is in those countries that were dependent on earth and were integrated into the global economy. and we don't think that in the muslim world you're not going to get them to where brazil, argentina, taiwan, or could we are unless the same classic got them to where they are also becomes empowered in the muslim world. so we look inward for a solution in the muslim world, without looking at what is the force that supposed to produce blue shin. i think the change agent and the muslim world ultimately will have to come from the middle-class and from the capitalist business sector associated with it. >> author of forces of fortune. thank you. >> thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. it is a pleasure to evacuate his magnificent building, this 18th century library, which i think it's one of the architectural models of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. and i'm delighted to be back here again. now this book, which is a big fat book can be used as a doorstop
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 10:00am EST
to find recent and featured programs. >> in her book, "can sexism in america," professor, writer and commentator barbara berg presents a documented argument that women in america hasn't come nearly as far as is generally believed. this event is 50 minutes. >> thank you very much and thank you, barnes & noble, for hosting this event. thank you all for coming. he pulled me by my hair, and he dragged me up 36 metal steps, each one i could feel as my cheek went against them making a mark in my face. i had to spend weeks in the hospital, and i will never look the same again. this story was not the worst i heard, far from the worst, n., while i was researching this book. but when i told a colleague about it, he said, sexism? are you kidding? there's no more sexism in america. that's so passe. and actually that's pretty much the kind of attitude i ran into when i first began to do the study. alive and well, my dentist asks, after hillary almost got the democratic nomination and sarah palin had the number two spot on the republican ticket? how can you say sexism is alive and well? i wond
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00am EST
level that fundamentally changed america. essentially laid the foundations for the kind of society, someone like barack obama, president in 2008. those are the voting rights act of 65, the civil rights act of 64, and the immigration act of 65. they all happened under lyndon johnson and they fundamentally transform who is america, who can vote, who can participate in the american creation of a society in a political system. so what i decided to do what it together this timeline of events from 1965 to the present that are important from an arab-american perspective. some of those events are important to all americans like 9/11. then other things, since the american memory is much shorter than the arab memory there are some events like the 73 energy crisis more than 91 goals or, sort of pass from american memory. and then other events like what happens to alex in california in 1985 are completely unknown to anybody outside of arab-american or out of aggressive circles and yet had quite an impact on the humidity all across the country. so once i decide to assemble a time when i went ab
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 7:00pm EST
america such night took to the british the whole story, laid it all out for them, lock stock and barrel but by 1989 gorbachev's harbor was beginning to raise. fewer call, president george w. bush met with gorbachev in december, a few months after the defect or on ships at that summit there was no mention of biological weapons at all. to one of the reasons was of course that bush was afraid to bring it up. it will blow up everything else to do was working on, the unification of germany within nato, strategic arms control and gorbachev didn't want to bring it up because of all she knew about the defector. he also realized that talk about biological weapons program on his watch would cause the world to us and questions about new thinking. so there was a little bit of a conspiracy of silence, but the soviet leadership worried terribly about how to respond if they got asked questions. and this continued to envelop or bischoff and bringing in his top advisers including foreign minister and the numerous meetings in the spring about how to respond and they finally decided to forgive any questio
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 10:30am EST
," fernandez that the price of gasoline are not the only problems for america's love of cars. ms. lutz fernandez speaks for 30 minutes in new canaan, connecticut. >> thank you, hello. welcome. and first of all i'd like to thank elm street books and the new canaan library for inviting me to speak tonight and thank you for coming to tonight. my name is anne lutz fernandez. i wanted to share with you initially just our decision to write the book, where that came from. and it really all happened just a few miles from here at my home in norwalk over thanksgiving weekend about four years ago. my sister and i were there. our family had gathered. and from various points driven, of course, to norwalk and my driveway was filled with cars. and spent a beautiful weekend celebration together. but invariably as had happened in the past prior few years, the conversation turned to the loss of our cousin christie in a car crash. and shortly after we lost christie, i lost a good friend in a highway crash. and these two losses had a profound affect on our lives. and we started chewing on the contradictio
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 11:00pm EST
. you can have working-class in america can wear blue jeans. . . when i wanted to show that everything sort of loosened up, but some countries don't like that anymo idea of 1968 but ther is much more vivid. it is a stirring picture of 1968 and and and sort of lord of all -- were a little. again in high school the tension with the beach boys are. so i was like traveling with the beach boys from -- i was traveling around the czech republic with the beach boys and tt didn' consequence. there was some other contract people would beat up people but i needed that sort of catharsis in the story and this is the most telling place in prague and in the book because this shows how silly the whole system became because when john lennon was shot in 1980 young people painted the walls which is in the beautiful part of prague and then somehow the government decided this is out of control the people cannot just paid whatever they want and this was artistic. it wasn't like i would say graffiti or it was somehow bad days and the police troops and painted the whole thing and then it started this game and
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 11:00am EST
-american people and i found my america there in many ways. parts of that receipt dated with me. everyone has their own journey. okay. that's good. do you need to say some closing -- thank you, everybody. [applause] >> alia malek is a former justice the permissible rights attorney and a contributor to the colu and the new york times. for more information on the author, you can go to aliamalek.com. >>> too good to be true is the name of the book by erin arvedlund the rise and fall of ferdinand off. what is too good to be true? >> everything about bernie madoff was good to be true. the returns, the consistency of the returns and the fact that nobody seemed to be knowing how he was investing the money. so all in all it turned out that if it really is too good to be true you should stay away. >> why did you write about bernie madoff? was there a fascination? >> i wrote a story back in 2001 questioning his returns and asking how he managed to run this billion dollar hedge fund and no one had ever heard of before. the story ran and nothing happened. seven years went by and then last december 08 he
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 10:30am EST
, to ban alcohol in america, and that went into effect in 1920. prohibition lasted only less than 14 years because of extreme civil disobedience. the law of the land. a lot of violence here from organized crime, and i think extreme indifference from the american public here. they didn't realize what they had gotten into here by signing up for prohibition or they thought it was simply something useful to have and realize pretty quickly that no, in fact the country has only been a drinking nation. and a lot of ways, the temperance movement was i.e. to believe that people just simply oh baby law and not take. >> in your book you seem to indicate that world war i has something to do with this? >> it did. a vastly part of how the anti-saloon got the 18th amendment through congress. and the asl, and isolated has been forgotten about. their own in existence for 40 years. they use the occasion of world war i when the united states went to war in germany in 1917, the largest ethnic group in the country at that time were germans. and guess who also worked the brewers? the germans, right? so yeah, ye
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 9:00am EST
, you can open the. if you pictured a man, then you are like over 90 percent of people in america who automatically respond is think later, think man. this was the result of three different studies done by catalyst, in which they discovered that americans default setting on leadership is male. and at any time a woman acts in ways that are a little more assertive, a little more demanding in the business world, she's considered an unnatural leader because she's a woman. but if she tries to be more collaborative, if she tries to be softer and gentler, well, forget it. she's too wishy-washy to be a leader. it's a real real double-blind. and we see the same thing in the arts. we see it in dance, we see in music. in fact, a woman architect said you know, i'm beginning to think that something like the bermuda triangle of that is happening to my coworkers. there were plenty of them in the pipeline, and from the 1970s there shortly said the. but they disappear when it comes to hire positions. there's so much discrimination against mothers in the workplace that it's actually even earned its own
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 10:00am EST
is the idea of a vacation. now, this may be a disappearing dream in america. i understand that, but the idea of a vacation, the idea of a 40 hour week, no child labor, these were ideas that were promoted 150 years ago by people like karl marx, if i may utter the words. karl marx did not create the soviet union. karl marx was a 19th century radical who sat around trying to figure out how to help working people, and had this idea with many other people, that working people have to work less than an 80 hour week. so they could think, so they could enjoy life, so they could read books. and i guess him being karl marx, so that they could go to a lot of meetings. and eventually, form unions. and out of that effort, there came the first transnational labor movement that led to labor unions in time, and lead to social democratic parties in europe, and lead to specific legislation, like vacations and the eight hour day. so who goes around thinking i'm on vacation, thank god for the labor movement? not many. i don't know where we think these things come from, but the book is an attempt to anchor them
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 12:00pm EST
i didn't know it was one thing which was common for me in my life with america that we found out we both were hiding under the tables in the fear of a nuclear war. because it was the solution at that time that the students would be hiding under the table like it would solve anything. i think i didn't like prague. what was happening outside very much, it wasn't very friendly place. it was a dark place. that was not that much fun going on. so in that time i painted everything in our house, some told me i was afraid my father would leave on sunday to begin, but i painted the light switches, and then i found these old chair so i made sort of series of the chairs for people who i wanted to be my friends. so this was somebody who was famous circus artist. this was a famous soccer player. even has the sox. and this was a famous tennis player because you play tennis on clay, so it is red. at that time nobody knew i would become artist in my life. let's face it, as an old person i can now say the chairs are made for sitting and not for painting on them. [laughter] >> this chair wasn't quit
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 8:00pm EST
and promulgated in america every single night. michael moore announced on the larry king show capitalism is over. this economic downturn shows it doesn't work. does anyone remember the one you to forget, newsweek ran a cover story, cover story that said we are all socialists now? do you remember that? it was only a few weeks ago and then "newsweek" came back -- john mechem, who's been a guest on my show several times, editor of newsweek, came back with a commentary. they will discover that says we are all socialists now and then he was railing and conservatives for suggesting obama is a crypto socialist. excuse me. on the cover of the magazine saying we are socialists now. the idea that cabalism is doomed -- i told this story in the book about a school in berkeley california that actually every year they would have some gift from the graduating eighth grade class. it was an elementary school private exclusive, very progressive school and the gift of the eighth grade class doubles graduating for 2009 was a beautiful mosaic the set on the wall from the other clauses capitalism will fail. and i tho
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 8:00pm EST
showed a 20-dollar bill, and the man said to her, but met them you can that leave america with $20. she said sir, do not worry, i have family here. the next day golda was speaking in chicago to the representative of the jewish federations of the united states, and her talk was one of the most moving talks that you can ever hear. she said to these people from america, is your right to live here in comfort. .. to asking for money to night. we need to buy machine guns, bullets, we need to send the millions of dollars that will mean survival and she was so touching those people were not at the beginning very inclined to have the jews of palestine. there were more interested in helping the jews of america. were so touched people started to get up from the room and come to the podium with a check with money with pledges they would pay so many hundreds of the lessons of dollars immediately and that might a telegram left chicago for prague skilling i have borrowed $3 million since you can borrow and then the next day she went to houston and the day after to san francisco to los angeles to
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 12:30am EST
they assemble to put their case before the world. new people of the world, you people in america and england and france and italy, look at this city and see that you may not abandon the city, that you cannot abandon the city >> instead berlin airlift is launched by a combined allied task force. >> their force assigned more than 300 airplanes and more than 20,000 men to the airlift and britain made a large congregation of both air. ♪ it was an observation without precedent and as a test of precision, of logistics and weather service. >> with 40 to 50 airplanes going simultaneously men's lives -- until the late stages they were flown in five different levels. this called for extremely precise air traffic control. >> some of us had bombed berlin and now we were keeping the same city alive. it meant we had to get more from each airplane and each man than ever before. >> the biggest was the call for utilities. it was packed in the g.i. pumpernickel. we collect bread. and milk for the kids. then medicine. every ounce of cargo was checked >> a new agreement signed in new york between them u.s.s.r
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 11:00am EST
in mexico and throughout latin america, the kind of weakening of the states and also civil society that is too fearful to speak up. >> and also the fact we spend $20 billion on the war on drugs. but what are the results? okay, in the drug traffickers revenues are about $40 billion. so who's winning this? >> before we open up for questions, can you just -- if he were to give any advice to the audience in terms of when they read these daily news accounts in the "dallas morning news" and "new york times," the houston chronicle, and we try to understand from a distance was going on and juarez and other cities in mexico. what would you say are some of the discourses to watch for, and it's even the press is kind of putting out there that my kind of mislead us in terms of understanding what's really happening on the ground facts >> i guess this idea to people involved in the drug world deserve to die and that doesn't really matter because they're criminals. mexico is a great country, a wonderful country. it's our ally, it's our neighbor. and when we see these numbers, 20 people massacred,
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 10:45am EST
discusses "a power governments cannot suppress", his collection of essays which critics america's response to it 9/11. howard zinn die geneina 27, 2010 at the age brandeis university in walter massachusetts this is an hour and five minutes. >> when you know, howard came and read here about a. half ago press and not long after he read when i picked up a book called will be we're about the current state of american politics written in by a man who coined the phrase counterculture. in that found out that he couldn't find a single publisher in the u.s. to pick up his book, there was not anyone who touches its. i think people get the impression that as long as books like if i did it by adjacency can get published anything canada published. [laughter] it is not the case so today we are here to celebrate something very fortunate to that looks and not like this can be published, that they cannot suppress it can be published by amazing press is like city lights and we can hear the voice directly and some of the greatest is living in the u.s. today, some of the greatest intellectuals and i'm proud t
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 7:00am EST
a homeless express that was traveling from san francisco to philadelphia. but it was great. that's america. the truth is, that more is available to more people than ever before. and anyone who doesn't see the added opportunities, comfort, life expectancy, educational opportunities, that we have that would have been undreamed of for our parents and grandparents, anyone who doesn't see that is deliberately blind and deaf. and limited, and embittered. my grandfather was a barrel maker. he came over from ukraine in 1910. he never stayed in a hotel in his life. why would you? that would be very rare for americans to one of the figured that i have in my book, people are not going to believe it but it's an official labor department figure and you know they wouldn't lie. labor department of the united states, typical american family, today spends more and eating out in dinners and is a fast food restaurant or luxuries restaurants or different kind of restaurant than the family spends on health care. and we spend too much on health care. the idea that capitalism is dead, i go into the reasons why c
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 10:30pm EST
in prohibition itself, which was a constitutional 18th amendment to ban alcohol in america and that went to effect in 1920. prohibition itself lasted less than 14 years because of extreme civil disobedience, the law of the land. and a lot of violence here from organized crime. and i think extreme indifference here from the american public. i didn't really realize what they had gotten into here i signing up for prohibition. if i was was just something useful to have and then realized pretty quickly that in fact the country has always been a drinking nation filemon of the ways the temperance movement was naÏve. that simply people would disobey the law and not drink. >> in your book you indicate that world war i had something to do with it. >> it did, yes. it is fascinating how the got the amendment through congress. the afl or anti-saloon league has been gotten forgotten about. from 1893 to 1918. when the united states went to war in germany in 1917, the largest ethnic group in the country at that time were germans and guess who also were their burgers? the germans. so, you had a whole et
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 1:00am EST
authorities and the attorney general at the time made a decision that the united states of america will look for dr. joseph mangling and they will check if the ever enter the united states and a historical investigation will be determined that mengele was arrested was true. that third investigation was actually given to the o isi and at the research of israel i was part of that investigation and one of the key elements was to try and find a true survivor of auschwitz by the name of david five men. apparently he worked in the laboratory and survived the war and he was the source of the information that benjamin had given to his superiors in the sea i see. they asked me to try to find him. a friend suggested that i take a look at the international tracing service. i don't know how many of you know, what that is but after the board therein billions of request to the red cross of people who lived in europe during the war. today would be called a data base but in those days was a massive index of cards or files with over 16 million index cards with the names and biographical information of peopl
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 3:00pm EST
of places in the world including the middle east and asia and the idea of america being hated in my old age as it were compared to what it was when i was a youth i take almost personally. the berlin airlift is who we are, not the tortures. and i wanted to bring that story out to the extent i can reevaluate who we are, where we came from, what we do and what we don't do and i think that is what was tapped in the american of tom brokaw's america the greatest generation and he talks about considering it not the first battle of the cold war but the last battle, last year battle of world war ii. but so in the and if i represent the american people in my heart, these are the people i want to be. >> is a marvelous story and we've just scratched the surface tonight. but i think we have time for questions and what we would like to ask you to do is if you would come to the come is there a microphone on this site? , here and queue up as the british say. i'm sure richard would be happy to take your questions. >> [inaudible] as i was listening to the reading of the book i realized how much of a hero tru
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 10:30pm EST
not the entertainer's concern. [applause] >> so, five more minuteses of thoughts? >> sure. >> i think america has found its new emerson. i'm an essayist myself, and a person who teaches writing to students who do not want to writees says. i want to thank you for breathing new life into the essay form, which seems particularly suited to expressing complex thought and being honest, the kind of stuff you're known for since "my dish with andre," and i hope you will continue to write more essays, and i think america needs more of wallace shawn. have a tv show would be good. >> i really don't know what to say. essays are wonderful form. absolutely. does anyone else -- >> you wrote it before an election that had different results than you were originally writing out, has your perception of the vote changed in a different way that some would think was better than the 2000 election? >> well, i'm not committing myself to saying that an election is inevitably nothing but a ritual or the 2004 election was nothing but a ritual. i was more saying that if people don't know what they're voting for, then it is a
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 11:15pm EST
the military into various countries in central america and at a certain point he stopped and turned around and said, you know, i was an errand boy for wall street. he realized that what he had done, what the american military had done in central america was to try to make central america countries in central america in the caribbean and haiti in the dominican republic and nicaragua and the honduras to make them profitable places for american corporations, not places where democracy would flourish and in fact democracy did not flourish in all of those places where we sent the marines to takeover and to do the bidding of american economic interests. of course bringing the history up to more recent times, if people even studied closely the history of the vietnam war, that was not that long ago, was that? there are people here who remember the vietnam war. despite the attempt of the media to forget the vietnam war, despite the attempts of our political leaders, when we went into iraq the first time in 1998-- 1991 and won this quick smashing victory, a splendid work just like the spanish-americ
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 11:15pm EST
and the fact that they testified to the continuing impact of america's most influential novelist of ideas. in the past 66 years, more than 25 million copies of radiance books have been sold. sales have surged recently perhaps in response to the financial turmoil in the takeovers and bailouts and expansions of government. rand remains a libertarian and these two new studies illustrate the growing scholarly interest and her work. stephen cox wrote in liberty magazine recently, rand remains america's most influential libertarian with the possible exception of milton friedman and america's most influential novelist of ideas. in that second category, there is no contest because there is no runner-up. now, i know -- [laughter] now i know that some of you wince when i say that rand was a libertarian. she insisted that she wasn't in many of her fans maintain that point even now. when i published my book, the libertarian reader which is a collection of writings on liberty from the bible to milton friedman and beyond. of course i wanted to include a couple of best buy's vice ayn rand. but the high
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 1:00am EST
. if you get one guy to try to make it nail, a pen or a nail, i have been in america so long i don't know which is british and american anymore but anyway he called it a pen factory. if you get one worker to try to make it nail it might take him all week with its 20 workers specializing in one individual tests such as cutting the metal, sharpening the end and attaching the ped you get enormous increase in productivity and only a few people can make tens of thousands of nails and a week so it is a simple example but the division of labor spread across the entire economy has produced enormous productivity growth. the other aspect of free market which smith identified in which again i think is true is that you get rewarded for success and punished for failure. not always. on wall street it doesn't necessarily work out that way. in general that the business produces things, a restaurant produces provided good service they do well when they can make profits. if they do badly and produce shoddy goods they got a business. that is the simple feedback mechanism but something lacking in other syste
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 6:45pm EST
that runs the place of america, radio free europe and other international broadcasts run by our government. what i felt was a really engaging introduction to american sketches walter isaacson shares the dr. she has had since his youth in new orleans to become a great writer. he was in a place he was soaking up the atmosphere of tennessee williams and william faulkner but he was also a very good friend of walter percy for many years until walter percy's death. before he went off to be a rhodes scholar the summer before, he was still on his great writer mission and offered a job as a summer intern by "the washington post" and he turned it down. he turned it down to become a stevedore on a derrick barge on the mississippi and the reason this was part of his great writer quest he felt that in doing so he could encounter so many crews of so many colorful characters that he could write a novel would be a serious contender to huckleberry finn. mark twain was the one he was trying to knock down. well, still, it didn't happen. but in his drawer, he says in his desk drawer their lies a manuscript st
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 9:45am EST
of his life, he was trying to warn america of the dangers of nazism and the terrorism that might be involved with the world war. and to wake us out of our isolationism and our rejection of the world around us and so forth. and i find it just incredible because he would keep doing this. and the portrait are terrific. the nixon ones are just too much. i mean, cry me out of the sewer. but the one i put up on my wall -- a couple days days -- this is where herb -- herb had a sense -- a pressien. he could foresee events. the day after the watergate break-in, june 17th, i think i was assistant manager of the paper at the time. and herb did a cartoon of the white house. it's in there. the white house, there's the white house. and then there's a gum oe, a guy looking -- a detective -- he's got footprints leading back and forth from the white house. it's strange they all seem to be connected to the place. there were crimes -- [laughter] stfter the break-in. just incredible. and that was his gift. i do think that you will find -- and i will you will share my enthusiasm and the belief of why
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 8:00am EST
today is complete nonsense. millions of irish people came to america speaking irish. the words didn't go away, they just transmuted into american. danny is the first person who has gone through it and there were communist words in the american language straight irish. we have not been shy to criticize the bush administration. we don't think the democratic party is the answer to everything. a dime's worth of difference basically saying -- in many ways between the two parties. lot of democrats got pretty mad. we occupy a different site. we figure pretty large. when people say we must like the democratic party, we are staying out. you know lot about life and the world. that is what we are about. listening to the sound of my father at 5:00 in the morning, a ten word typewriter tracking away. that was a different era. i grew up with hot metal type in newspapers. my dad who was a great writer, i applaud -- one telephone line from southern ireland in the middle 50s. he finished writing his article and jumped on his bike to ride three miles to tell. only time he got mad at me in my childhood was
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 10:00pm EST
] everybody in america is polite and cheerful but we will let you know, it and then they said he is not going home. i was not invited as much and i really did not know what to do with myself. i remember one day i met and she was collecting paintings and said i wonder if we could pay for that. i paid for them and tried to blow up the inside of the stereo. [laughter] and i started to do it without it. she was the head of the municipal art gallery. i did not understand i was there for free and people pay for this school and i was supposed to be nice to them so they would keep paying. but was prepared to sacrifice everything and i thought they would have to stay up all night in they said this is california why should we stay up all night? we can do that in the daytime. i a understand that now. i've lost my teaching job. a friend said sent this to maurice sendak. the things that we talk about today are based on my misunderstanding and i have no intention to go into children's books he called me collect i really did not want to be in children's books. but you are in the best place in america it is
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 3:00am EST
at the first gulf war, and he is also the head of the veterans against america's war of which they are getting too many. he will pass along you recruiting right and left. it is kind of interesting within the military, and i began life in a room in the cadet hospital at west point where i was delivered by a future surgeon general of the army who hadn't been told about navels. i did not have the repairs made. surprised should always be offered, on offer anyway. in a security world we are not really needed, and it used to be just as an idea united states was something quite remarkable, and now i wonder that we have been crowded over, and it was -- there is a photograph in this new book i've published that's nothing but photographs of myself which is highly satisfactory. [laughter] and perhaps a bit overdone. a young man, a fellow writer always competitive and he saw that picture of me which they have run on the cover of the book, and he said i didn't know that you were a male model and i suggest, yes, of course i am. who says a male model can't go to the top? [laughter] he smashed his teeth and h
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 4:00pm EST
. another husky easy basket. they push the lead to 77-48. bank of america arena is impressed. after struggling in the desert, all huskies thursday against stanford and saturday against cal. >> steve: we'll be right back. dy tink ng? ♪ kfc grrwing nate grio se thef-a-aste who tring r aet o ♪ in the associated press rankings. arizona state was a bit higher at 39, and then an impressive win on thursday at oregon state. thomas. inside seven to go. >> marques: now taking a little bit more time off. a little bit more deliberate offensively. good transition defense by the huskies. three white shirts back in the paint. opens up the bad shot. >> steve: quincy. he's fouled. that trio that came in so strong. randle averaging 20, christopher 16. and theo robertson, the only guy who really recorded today. christopher with 25. look at the day by jerome randle. five points and nine turnovers. fourth foul on jerome. >> marques: jamal boykin has four points today. he's another guy that averages double figures for this cal team. you look to depend on to give you double figures scoring night in an
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 4:55pm EST
the most popular sport on the planet. except, of course, in america. so when the world famous david beckham went looking for a new team to play for, who expected him to come to the states? >> the decision to join the galaxy wasn't hard. >> $250 million over five years is what david will make. >> i'm coming there not to be the superstar. i'm coming there to be part of the team on the american side. it's very exciting for me and my family as well. ? fans have endured a century worth of failure and bad cluck. in 2003 the team was within five outs to the trip to the world series when madam misfortune reared her ugly head yet again. >> down the left-field line. into >> awfully close to interference right there. that was very, very close. >> that's a tough way to try to make that catch. >> why? here at wrigley when the opposing teal hit the home run, they throw the ball back onto the field. i'm surprised someone hasn't thrown that fan onto the field. >>> the 2007 dallas dominated tba'slar seas qualified for postseason on the final day of the regular season. somebody forgot to tell the warriors th
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 8:00am EST
. bush. she went to saint john's, which is one of the finest private schools in america. george w. bush wanted to go to saint john's but they wouldn't let him in. so he went to kinkaid, which is not a bad school also. another very powerful ride school. but they were in the same area. they just live down the block from each other in river oaks area. they went to the same country clubs, they were in that the nexus of the high-energy and high political world in texas. senator john tower would drop by the house. john tower would. that's the kind of if i'm she grew a. she begin resisting, get back on track, she began looking at things -- i think she felt were seditious and he said. something that was just going to bug the crap out of her father, and she began reading a little publication that a friend of hers had had in her house that, you know, clearly was not welcome at the ivins house. although it was called "the texas observer." unit, 32nd sale pitch, support "the texas observer." if you believe in molly ivins, if you believe in independent journalism, subscribe to it. go online, tell th
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 8:00pm EST
. she went to st. john's which is one of the finest private schools in america. george w. bush wanted to go to st. john's but they wouldn't let him and so he went to kincaid which isn't a bad school, another very prominent powerful school but they were in the same orbit. just down the block from each other in the river oaks area and they mingled with the country clubs and they were in the nexus of the high energy and political world in texas. senator john tower drop by the house. just the kind of environment, she grow extremely conservative and began resisting -- back on track should begin looking at things i think she felt were seditious, something the was going to bug the crap out of her father, and she began reading a little publication that a friend of hers had in her house that clearly was not welcome at the speed delete the ivins house also would was called the texas observer, 32nd sales pitch, if you believe molly ivins and fierce journalism by a copy of it, subscribe, go on line, told them you love them. the observers defined by many ways molly's sensibility or ethos or her vi
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2010 6:30am EST
, and competition in terms of competition which is as good as happened in america in the late 19th century. you know, one of the interesting things i have to add to that is, and i don't know what the consequences will be in the longer run, but it has to be noted that the chinese state is much more present in the chinese economy that is true in any of the asia tigers. so for example, even, the big companies are still predominantly state-owned the privatizations that was introduced at the end of, in the late 1990s didn't go nearly as far as it went in russia. thankfully i think for them. and many other private firms -- well, yeah? >> over and over, yes. i wish i didn't. >> but, you know, the main shareholder is the chinese economy. so it's a very chinese state solution to the question. and i'm not -- at the end of the day you have to say, over the last 30 years china has grown at over 10% a year, and has clearly and all sorts of way been remarkable transformation. it has been responsible on its own for over half the reduction in poverty in the world. now, this is an extraordinary achievement. and the
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 11:15am EST
cox wrote in liberty magazine recently, ayn rand remains america's most influential libertarian with the possible exception of milton friedman and america's most influential novelists of ideas. in the second category there is no contest because there is no runner-up. i know that some of you wince when i say ayn rand was a libertarian. she insisted she wasn't and many of her fans maintain that point even now. when i published my book the libertarian reader which is a collection of classic writings on liberty from the bible to milton friedman and beyond and wanted to include a couple but the high priests of her estate would not allow that. they would not allow ayn rand appear in a book with a libertarian in the title. but anyone who believes in individual rights, free enterprise and limited government is a libertarian and ayn rand certainly did. as i said once to and ayn rand fan who didn't want to read knit was a libertarian quote another great woman of the 1940s, but you are, blanch, you are. she had a major impact on the libertarian movement in two way is. first is just a numbe
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 10:00am EST
ii editorial cartoons of america's leading comic artists," a sequel to the first venture of dr. seuss in world war ii which was published ten years ago. andre schiffrin has uncovered a new treasure trove of dr. seuss cartoons from world war ii archives. this new book is bringing those wonderful cartoons and illustrations from this moment. andre schiffrin has been an editor for 50 years. as founding director of the new press. his most recent publication before dr. seuss is political education: coming of age in paris and new york. one of the chapters at a seminar year and a half ago. i am pleased to note that andre schiffrin at the same time donated a wonderful archive, and editorial, worked with industrial democracy which provides a very interesting window into the birth of a new life. andre schiffrin will be joined tonight by milkman, author of a new deal and journalism, the story of p.m.. paul teaches english at the new york city school system and has a ph.d. from rutgers university. andre schiffrin is going to say a few words to provide some context to the book. then andre sc
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 5:00pm EST
of the g-7 economies, and mexico after all was in latin america. so latin america historically has had a history of financial volatility. lots of crises. so the mexican crisis yet occurred against the backdrop in which mexico months before the crisis had been upgraded by the rating agencies. mexico city had been admitted to the organization of the oecd. mexico was a poster child at the time of the imf. but at any rate the mexican crisis unfolded and at that time i was still working for the international monetary fund and there was what the imf calls a mission, it sounds like mission impossible, maybe this but it is a visit we went through indonesia, hong kong, singapore, japan, and it was about five and half weeks long and it was to assess financial vulnerabilities in these countries at that time and you could not go anywhere without hearing news about the evolution of the mexican crisis. and the issue was raised at the time well, you know, a lot of these countries which these were the east asia tigers by and large had had a history of more than a decade of incredibly high growth, low
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 6:00pm EST
the music corporation of america, a band-booking agency, in chicago in 1924, in al capone's chicago. and it was from that company that, eventually, wasserman was launched. c-span: because this is a political network, the first thing i want to connect is that katrina vanden heuvel is his granddaughter. >> guest: is jules stein's granddaughter, yes. c-span: and he's with "the nation," and the editor and all that. >> guest: right. c-span: was jules stein -- was a republican. >> guest: a right-wing republican. c-span: well, explain all that connection in the -- and how does -- you know, where does the vanden heuvel come in in all this? >> guest: well, jules had two daughters, jean and susan. and jean is the mother of -- jean stein is the mother of katrina. and jean was always -- her politics were always different than her father's, and it was a source of great friction between then. and -- i mean, jules was very proud of her. she was a very accomplished person. but -- but their politics were just polar opposites, really. and katrina followed in her mother's footsteps. c-spa
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